Biography of abraham lincoln pdf

 

    The Project Gutenberg EBook of Abraham Lincoln, by Lord Charnwood . much as is common in great men's biographies or can as a rule be. Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, guided his country through the most devastating experience in its national history--the CIVIL WAR. Download the FREE e-Book version of the biography of Abraham Lincoln by James Russell To read the whole book, please download the full eBook PDF.

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    Biography Of Abraham Lincoln Pdf

    To the younger generation,writes Carl Schurz, Abraham Lincoln has already become The great mine of information concerning the facts of Lincoln's life is, and. Among history's heroes, Abraham Lincoln stands out as THE American celebrate the life and legacy of America s 16th president while reinvigorating his . The Life of Abraham Lincoln, from His Birth to His Inauguration as President. Book Cover. Download; Bibrec.

    Burlingame is the author or editor of over a dozen books on Abraham Lincoln. He is currently a professor at the University of Illinois at Springfield. It is also the first comprehensive, multi-volume work on Lincoln in two-thirds of a century. But while the published two-volume series is substantial, its uncondensed and far more heavily footnoted version is twice the size — and free online. This biography is obviously the result of time-consuming and painstaking research. Nonetheless this biography is still far more extensive, and exhaustive, than most readers will require — or desire. Navigating these two volumes requires a fair degree of patience and perseverance.

    A few days before the completion of his eighth year, in the absence of his father, a flock of wild turkeys approached the new log cabin, and Abraham with a rifle-gun, standing inside, shot through a crack and killed one of them. He has never since pulled a trigger on any larger game. In the autumn of his mother died; and a year afterward his father married Mrs. Sally Johnston, at Elizabethtown, Kentucky, a widow with three children of her first marriage.

    She proved a good and kind mother to Abraham, and is still living in Coles County, Illinois. There were no children of this second marriage. His father's residence continued at the same place in Indiana till He does not remember any other. The family of Mr. Dorsey now resides in Schuyler County, Illinois. Abraham now thinks that the aggregate of all his schooling did not amount to one year. He was never in a college or academy as a student, and never inside of a college or academy building till since he had a law license.

    What he has in the way of education he has picked up. After he was twenty-three and had separated from his father, he studied English grammar--imperfectly, of course, but so as to speak and write as well as he now does.

    He studied and nearly mastered the six books of Euclid since he was a member of Congress. He regrets his want of education, and does what he can to supply the want. In his tenth year he was kicked by a horse, and apparently killed for a time. When he was nineteen, still residing in Indiana, he made his first trip upon a flatboat to New Orleans.

    He was a hired hand merely, and he and a son of the owner, without other assistance, made the trip. The nature of part of the "cargo-load," as it was called, made it necessary for them to linger and trade along the sugar-coast; and one night they were attacked by seven negroes with intent to kill and rob them.

    March 1, , Abraham having just completed his twenty-first year, his father and family, with the families of the two daughters and sons-in-law of his stepmother, left the old homestead in Indiana and came to Illinois. Their mode of conveyance was wagons drawn by ox-teams, and Abraham drove one of the teams. They reached the county of Macon, and stopped there some time within the same month of March. His father and family settled a new place on the north side of the Sangamon River, at the junction of the timberland and prairie, about ten miles westerly from Decatur.

    Here they built a log cabin, into which they removed, and made sufficient of rails to fence ten acres of ground, fenced and broke the ground, and raised a crop of sown corn upon it the same year. These are, or are supposed to be, the rails about which so much is being said just now, though these are far from being the first or only rails ever made by Abraham. The sons-in-law were temporarily settled in other places in the county.

    In the autumn all hands were greatly afflicted with ague and fever, to which they had not been used, and by which they were greatly discouraged, so much so that they determined on leaving the county. They remained, however, through the succeeding winter, which was the winter of the very celebrated "deep snow" of Illinois.

    During that winter Abraham, together with his stepmother's son, John D.

    John Hay's Lincoln and Lincoln's John Hay

    Johnston, and John Hanks, yet residing in Macon County, hired themselves to Denton Offutt to take a flatboat from Beardstown, Illinois, to New Orleans; and for that purpose were to join him--Offutt--at Springfield, Illinois, so soon as the snow should go off. When it did go off, which was about the first of March, , the county was so flooded as to make traveling by land impracticable; to obviate which difficulty they downloadd a large canoe, and came down the Sangamon River in it.

    This is the time and the manner of Abraham's first entrance into Sangamon County. They found Offutt at Springfield, but learned from him that he had failed in getting a boat at Beardstown.

    This led to their hiring themselves to him for twelve dollars per month each, and getting the timber out of the trees and building a boat at Old Sangamon town on the Sangamon River, seven miles northwest of Springfield, which boat they took to New Orleans, substantially upon the old contract. During this boat-enterprise acquaintance with Offutt, who was previously an entire stranger, he conceived a liking for Abraham, and believing he could turn him to account, he contracted with him to act as clerk for him, on his return from New Orleans, in charge of a store and mill at New Salem, then in Sangamon, now in Menard County.

    Hanks had not gone to New Orleans, but having a family, and being likely to be detained from home longer than at first expected, had turned back from St. He is the same John Hanks who now engineers the "rail enterprise" at Decatur, and is a first cousin to Abraham's mother.

    Abraham's father, with his own family and others mentioned, had, in pursuance of their intention, removed from Macon to Coles County. John D. Johnston, the stepmother's son, went with them, and Abraham stopped indefinitely and for the first time, as it were, by himself at New Salem, before mentioned. This was in July, Here he rapidly made acquaintances and friends. In less than a year Offutt's business was failing--had almost failed--when the Black Hawk war of broke out.

    Abraham joined a volunteer company, and, to his own surprise, was elected captain of it. He says he has not since had any success in life which gave him so much satisfaction. He went to the campaign, served near three months, met the ordinary hardships of such an expedition, but was in no battle.

    He now owns, in Iowa, the land upon which his own warrants for the service were located. Returning from the campaign, and encouraged by his great popularity among his immediate neighbors, he the same year ran for the legislature, and was beaten,--his own precinct, however, casting its votes for and 7 against him--and that, too, while he was an avowed Clay man, and the precinct the autumn afterward giving a majority of to General Jackson over Mr.

    This was the only time Abraham was ever beaten on a direct vote of the people. He was now without means and out of business, but was anxious to remain with his friends who had treated him with so much generosity, especially as he had nothing elsewhere to go to. He studied what he should do--thought of learning the blacksmith trade--thought of trying to study law--rather thought he could not succeed at that without a better education.

    Before long, strangely enough, a man offered to sell, and did sell, to Abraham and another as poor as himself, an old stock of goods, upon credit. They opened as merchants; and he says that was the store. Of course they did nothing but get deeper and deeper in debt. He was appointed postmaster at New Salem--the office being too insignificant to make his politics an objection. The store winked out. The surveyor of Sangamon offered to depute to Abraham that portion of his work which was within his part of the county.

    He accepted, procured a compass and chain, studied Flint and Gibson a little, and went at it. This procured bread, and kept soul and body together. The election of came, and he was then elected to the legislature by the highest vote cast for any candidate. Major John T. Stuart, then in full practice of the law, was also elected.

    During the canvass, in a private conversation he encouraged Abraham [to] study law. After the election he borrowed books of Stuart, took them home with him, and went at it in good earnest.

    A Short Life Of Abraham Lincoln, by John G. Nicolay.

    He studied with nobody. He still mixed in the surveying to pay board and clothing bills. When the legislature met, the lawbooks were dropped, but were taken up again at the end of the session. He was reelected in , , and In the autumn of he obtained a law license, and on April 15, , removed to Springfield, and commenced the practice--his old friend Stuart taking him into partnership. March 3, , by a protest entered upon the "Illinois House Journal" of that date, at pages and , Abraham, with Dan Stone, another representative of Sangamon, briefly defined his position on the slavery question; and so far as it goes, it was then the same that it is now.

    The protest is as follows: "Resolutions upon the subject of domestic slavery having passed both branches of the General Assembly at its present session, the undersigned hereby protest against the passage of the same. Lincoln's party voted for him as Speaker, but being in the minority he was not elected. After he declined a reelection to the legislature. He was on the Harrison electoral ticket in , and on that of Clay in , and spent much time and labor in both those canvasses.

    In November, , he was married to Mary, daughter of Robert S. Todd, of Lexington, Kentucky.

    They have three living children, all sons, one born in , one in , and one in They lost one, who was born in In he was elected to the lower House of Congress, and served one term only, commencing in December, , and ending with the inauguration of General Taylor, in March All the battles of the Mexican war had been fought before Mr. Lincoln took his seat in Congress, but the American army was still in Mexico, and the treaty of peace was not fully and formally ratified till the June afterward.

    Much has been said of his course in Congress in regard to this war. A careful examination of the "Journal" and "Congressional Globe" shows that he voted for all the supply measures that came up, and for all the measures in any way favorable to the officers, soldiers, and their families, who conducted the war through: with the exception that some of these measures passed without yeas and nays, leaving no record as to how particular men voted.

    The "Journal" and "Globe" also show him voting that the war was unnecessarily and unconstitutionally begun by the President of the United States. This is the language of Mr. Ashmun's amendment, for which Mr. Lincoln and nearly or quite all other Whigs of the House of Representatives voted.

    Lincoln's reasons for the opinion expressed by this vote were briefly that the President had sent General Taylor into an inhabited part of the country belonging to Mexico, and not to the United States, and thereby had provoked the first act of hostility, in fact the commencement of the war; that the place, being the country bordering on the east bank of the Rio Grande, was inhabited by native Mexicans, born there under the Mexican government, and had never submitted to, nor been conquered by, Texas or the United States, nor transferred to either by treaty; that although Texas claimed the Rio Grande as her boundary, Mexico had never recognized it, and neither Texas nor the United States had ever enforced it; that there was a broad desert between that and the country over which Texas had actual control; that the country where hostilities commenced, having once belonged to Mexico, must remain so until it was somehow legally transferred, which had never been done.

    Then Lincoln began his practice with William Herndon , whom Lincoln thought "a studious young man". House of Representatives, — Lincoln in his late 30s as a member of the U. House of Representatives. Photo taken by one of Lincoln's law students around From the early s, Lincoln was a steadfast Whig and professed to friends in to be "an old line Whig, a disciple of Henry Clay". House of Representatives in , but was defeated by John J. However, Lincoln won support for the principle of rotation, whereby Hardin would retire after only one term.

    Lincoln hoped that this arrangement would lead to his nomination in He was the only Whig in the Illinois delegation, showing party loyalty by participating in almost all votes and making speeches that echoed the party line.

    Giddings , wrote a bill to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia with compensation for the owners, enforcement to capture fugitive slaves, and a popular vote on the matter. He abandoned the bill when it failed to garner sufficient Whig supporters.

    Polk 's desire for "military glory—that attractive rainbow, that rises in showers of blood".

    A Short Biography of Abraham Lincoln

    The war had begun with a Mexican slaughter of American soldiers in territory disputed by Mexico and the U. Polk insisted that Mexican soldiers had "invaded our territory and shed the blood of our fellow-citizens on our own soil".

    One Illinois newspaper derisively nicknamed him "spotty Lincoln". As a riverboat man, Lincoln initially favored those interests, but ultimately represented whoever hired him.

    The idea was never commercialized, but Lincoln is the only president to hold a patent. Barret, who had refused to pay the balance on his pledge to download shares on the grounds that the company had changed its original train route. The decision by the Illinois Supreme Court was cited by many other courts.

    After an opposing witness testified to seeing the crime in the moonlight, Lincoln produced a Farmers' Almanac showing the moon was at a low angle, drastically reducing visibility.

    Armstrong was acquitted. Instead of holding Lincoln in contempt of court as was expected, the judge, a Democrat, reversed his ruling, allowing the evidence and acquitting Harrison. The Compromise of failed to defuse the issue. The proposal alarmed many Northerners, who hoped to prevent the spread of slavery into the territories. I cannot but hate it. I hate it because of the monstrous injustice of slavery itself.

    I hate it because it deprives our republican example of its just influence in the world Reflecting the demise of his party, Lincoln wrote in , "I think I am a Whig, but others say there are no Whigs, and that I am an abolitionist [ Lincoln instructed his backers to vote for Lyman Trumbull. Trumbull was an antislavery Democrat, and had received few votes in the earlier ballots; his supporters, also antislavery Democrats, had vowed not to support any Whig.

    Lincoln's decision to withdraw enabled his Whig supporters and Trumbull's antislavery Democrats to combine and defeat the mainstream Democratic candidate, Joel Aldrich Matteson.

    As the elections approached, Lincoln joined the Republicans. The convention platform asserted that Congress had the right to regulate slavery in the territories and called for the immediate admission of Kansas as a free state.

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